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Title Type Authors Abstract Abstract Number Date / Time Location
Categorical Meets Dimensional: A Fuzzy Categorical Conception of Autism Spectrum Poster

Tunç, B., Parker, D., Pandey, J., Verma, R.,& Schultz, R.T

Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is presumed to have a categorical distinction from other disorders and the general population. Much current research, however, concentrates on testing whether ASD is better described by dimensional traits defined over continua. This oversimplifying dichotomy of “categorical vs. dimensional” obscures more finely graded possible alternatives, corresponding to structures that are neither purely categorical nor purely dimensional.

24502 Friday, May 12, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel)
Brain Enlargement Persists Through Adolescence in ASD, But is Not Predicted by Clinical Severity Poster

Yankowitz, L.D., Herrington, J.D., Pereira, J.A., Yerys, B.E., Pandey, J., Schultz, R.T.

Background: Converging evidence indicates that toddlers and early school age youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have larger brains than Typically Developing Controls (TDC). It remains unclear, however, if this enlargement persists beyond early development or whether there is later a period of arrested brain growth in ASD such that group differences disappear by adolescence or adulthood. Unfortunately, a majority of studies on this topic may be underpowered to detect the expected effects.

25639 Friday, May 12, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel) Image icon Brain Enlargement Persists Through Adolesence-min.jpg
Autism Quotient Scores Modulate the Perception and Production of Text Specificity in Typical Adult Females Poster

Li, J. J,, Parish-Morris, J.,  Bateman, L., Nenkova, A.

Background:

24784 Friday, May 12, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel) Image icon Autism Quotient Scores-min.jpg
Motor Behavior as a Qualitative Difference in the Spontaneous Production of Co-Speech Hand Gestures by Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders Poster

Bagdasarov, A., Kim, E., Zhang, Y., Dravis, Z., Cola, M., Maddox, B., Ferguson, E., Adeoye, L., Fergusson, F., Pallathra, A., Minyanou, N., Bateman, L., Pomykacz, A., Bartley, K., Brodkin, E., Pandey, J., Parish-Morris, J., Schultz., R.T., & de Marchena, A.

Background:
Deficits in nonverbal communication are a required symptom for diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). DSM-5 stresses that nonverbal communication in ASD is often characterized by qualitative differences, in addition to reduced frequency. These qualitative differences have been inadequately described, in part because qualitative features of behavior are by definition challenging to quantify. Here we examine one qualitative feature of nonverbal communication in ASD: motor behavior during spontaneously produced co-speech hand gestures.

24492 Friday, May 12, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel) Image icon Motor behavior as a Qualitative Difference-min (1).jpg
Humor Responses and Social Referencing in Children with ASD: The Role of Social Cognitive Complexity Poster

Ferguson, E., Brown, J., Minyanou, N., Bateman, L., Dravis, Z., Cola, M., Pomykacz, A., de Marchena, A., Bartley, K., Kim, E., Pandey, J., Schultz, R., & Parish-Morris, J

Background: Humor is a universal experience, but some kinds of humor are more complex than others. Slapstick humor and social humor, for example, rely on two different types of cognitive processes and levels of social understanding.

25280 Friday, May 12, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel) Image icon Humor Responses and Social Referencing-min.jpg
Defining Domains of Social Functioning in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder as Targets for Treatment Poster

Pallathra, A.A., Day-Watkins, J., Calkins, M.E., Maddox, B.B., Miller, J.S., Parish-Morris, J., Herrington, J., Kangovi, S., Tomlinson, R., Creed, T., Kerns, C., Bilker, W.B., Handy, F., Connell, J.E., Dichter, G., Mandell, D.S., Schultz, R.T., & Brodkin, E.S.

Background: There is increasing recognition of the need to develop treatments for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to improve their social functioning, a key factor in adults’ employment, relationships, and overall quality of life (Howlin et al., 2013; Shattuck et al., 2012).  However, little is known about the relative level of impairment in various behavioral domains underlying social functioning, or about the relationship among these behavioral domains in adults with ASD.

24887 Friday, May 12, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel)
TUNE In, A Novel Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Program to Improve Social Functioning in Adults with ASD: Pilot Study Results Poster

Pallathra, A.A., Day-Watkins, J., Calkins, M.E., Maddox, B., Miller, J., Parish-Morris, J., Herrington, J., Kangovi, S., Tomlinson, R., Creed, T., Kerns, C., Bilker, W., Handy, F., Connell, J., Dichter, G., Mandell, D., Schultz, R.T., Brodkin, E.S.

Background: In the coming decade, approximately 600,000 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) will reach adulthood in the United States. They, and the several million adults currently diagnosed with ASD, will need ongoing services and support. However, there are few evidence-based treatment programs for adults with ASD beyond their early twenties to improve social functioning, a key factor in adults’ employment, relationships, and overall quality of life (Howlin, Moss, Savage, & Rutter, 2013; Shattuck et al., 2012).

25807 Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel)
Preschool Peer Relationships in Younger Siblings of Children with ASD Poster

A. Estes1, J. Munson2, T. St. John3, M. J. Guralnick4, S. Dager5, A. Rodda2, H. C. Hazlett6, K. Botteron7, R. T. Schultz8, J. Piven9 and T. The IBIS Network, (1)Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington Autism Center, Seattle, WA, (2)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)University of Washington Autism Center, Seattle, WA, (4)Psychology and Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (5)University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, (6)Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (7)Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, (8)The Center for Autism Research, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (9)Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, Carrboro, NC, (10)University of NC, Chapel Hill, NC

Background: Peer competence and friendships are major developmental achievements in middle-childhood and are related to emotional well-being and academic skills. Peer relationships in preschool provide opportunities to develop the skills required for these achievements. By school-age, children with ASD demonstrate fewer reciprocal friendships and poorer peer competence than same-age peers. However, little is known about peer relationships in preschool-age children with ASD.

25781 Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel) Image icon Scultz.Estes_.IBIS_.Preschool.IMFAR2107Poster.jpg
Positive and Negative Affective Vocalizations in 2-year-olds with ASD Poster

Plate, S., Parish-Morris, J., Migliaccio, J., Bateman, L., Wood, J., Slomowitz, R., Maldarelli, J., Paterson, S., Pandey, J., Marrus, N., Estes, A., Hazlett, H., Zwaigenbaum, L., Botteron, K., Dager, S., Piven, J., Schultz, R.T., & the IBIS Network

Background: Research on affect in young children with ASD suggests that they are less socially reactive, smile less, and show more distress reactions than typical peers (Cassel et al., 2011; Zwaigenbaum et al., 2005). Child temperament is particularly important to study because children with difficult temperaments are at increased risk of child abuse and neglect (Fisher, Hodapp, and Dykens, 2008).

25476 Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel) Image icon Positive and Negative Affective Vocalization-min.jpg
High-Risk Infants (That Do Not Develop ASD) Are Characterized By Volubility

Migliaccio, J., Parish-Morris, J., Plate, S., Bateman, L., Wood, J., Slomowitz, R., Maldarelli, J., Pandey, J., Swanson, M., Paterson, S., Marrus, N., Estes, A., Hazlett, H., Zwaigenbaum, L., Botteron, K., Dager, S., Piven, J., Schultz, R.T., & the IBIS Network

Background. Recent research using home-based digital audio recordings at 9 months of age suggests that some children at high-familial risk for ASD are “hyper-vocalizers,” producing more vocalizations than low-risk peers (Swanson et al., in press). More vocalizations are associated with higher rates of conversational turn-taking, potentially contributing to a “social feedback loop” that is beneficial to children’s social development (Warlaumont, 2014).

25441 Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel) Image icon High-Risk Infants are Characterized by Volubility-min.jpg
Examining Sex Differences in Adaptive Behavioral Development in High Risk Infants with ASD, Social Communicative Delay, and Typical Development Poster

Sharer, E.A., Constantino, J.N., Botteron, K.N., Estes, A.M., Hazlett, H.C., Schultz, R.T., Piven, J., & Elison, J.T. for the IBIS Network.

Background: There is notable phenotypic heterogeneity among high-risk (HR) siblings of children with autism who do not meet ASD diagnostic criteria. A substantial proportion of non-ASD HR siblings manifest a profile of subthreshold ASD symptoms and/or low developmental level compared to low-risk (LR) children (Messinger et al., 2013). More work is needed to understand heterogeneity in HR siblings and to potentially elucidate sex-specific differences, if present.

25185 Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel)
Effects of a School-Based Exercise Intervention Program on Stress and Executive Functioning in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Other Special Education Needs Poster

Elliott, N., Koegel, L. K., Gore, M., & McCleery, J. P.

Background:  Extensive research has shown that physical exercise produces positive impacts on physical and psychological health indicators across numerous populations.  With regards to psychological health, evidence suggests reduced stress and improved executive functioning as a result of exercise.  As a clinical intervention, exercise has a number of advantages, including feasibility of implementation by staff at various levels of training, or by patients themselves, and completion at low cost to both the individual and society.  Thus, exercise intervention has great poten

26066 Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm Golden Gate Ballroom (Marriott Marquis Hotel) Image icon School-Based Exercise Intervention-min.jpg
Patterns of Individual Change in Response to Reciprocal Imitation Training

S. Malik, C. Oliver, C. Stefanidou, J. Moss, B. Ingersoll, A. Wainer, L. Kossyvaki and J. McCleery

Abstract Text: 

Background: Reciprocal Imitation Training (RIT) is a naturalistic developmental behavioural intervention targeting social imitation skills. Previous research has shown RIT to be effective in increasing spontaneous object and gesture imitation. In a recent replication trial of a previous pilot-RCT of RIT, our RIT treatment group demonstrated a significant increase in spontaneous play-based object imitation skills compared with a wait-list control group (Malik, 2016). Alternatively, we did not replicate previously observed gains in elicited imitation skills.

Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 3:00pm Image icon Patterns of Individual Change-min.jpg